What Are The Basics Of Accounting Methods

What are accounting methods? Accounting methods help businesses keep their cash records and assist in preparing money reports by utilizing two fundamental methods of record-keeping for cash.  These two methods are cash-basis and accrual basis accounting.  These methods both have their own distinctive advantages of keeping corporate record keeping which help keep track of money coming an and out of the business. Donohoo Accounting knows what are the two types of accounting methods and how to utilize the for your business.

 

Accounting methods help businesses keep their cash records and assist in preparing money reports by utilizing two fundamental methods of record-keeping for cash.
Accounting methods help businesses keep their cash records and assist in preparing money reports by utilizing two fundamental methods of record-keeping for cash.

 

CASH-BASIS ACCOUNTING

What is cash-basis accounting? Corporations recording expenses in financial accounts when the cash is laid out, and they book revenue when they actually hold the cash in their hot little hands or, more likely, in a bank account. For example, if a plumber completed a project on December 30, 2018, but doesn’t get paid for it until the owner inspects it on January 10, 2019, the plumber reports those cash earnings on her 2018 tax report. In cash-basis accounting, cash earnings include checks, credit-card receipts, or any other form of revenue from customers.

 

Corporations recording expenses in financial accounts when the cash is laid out, and they book revenue when they actually hold the cash in their hot little hands or, more likely, in a bank account.
Corporations recording expenses in financial accounts when the cash is laid out, and they book revenue when they actually hold the cash in their hot little hands or, more likely, in a bank account.

 

ACCRUAL ACCOUNTING

Does your company use accrual accounting? This method is when you record revenue when the actual business is completed ex. (is when the completed amount of work that was stated in a contract agreement between the company and its client), not when it obtains the cash. The company records income when it produces it, even if the customer hasn’t paid yet. For example, a plumbing contractor who uses accrual accounting records the revenue earned when the job is completed, even if the client hasn’t paid the final invoice yet. Expenditures are handled in the same way.

 

The company records income when it produces it, even if the customer hasn’t paid yet.
The company records income when it produces it, even if the customer hasn’t paid yet.

 

BASIC ACCOUNTING TERMS

  • Equity: The net worth of your company. Also called owner’s equity or capital. Equity comes from investment in the business by the owners, plus accumulated net profits of the business that have not been paid out to the owners. It essentially represents amounts owed to the owners. Equity accounts are balance sheet accounts.

 

  • Assets: Things of value held by your business. Assets are balance sheet accounts. Examples of assets are cash, accounts receivable and furniture and fixtures.

 

  • Liabilities: What your business owes creditors. Liabilities are balance sheet accounts. Examples are accounts payable, payroll taxes payable and loans payable.

 

  • Debits: At least one component of every accounting transaction is a debit amount. Debits increase assets and decrease liabilities and equity.

 

 

While all these terms may seem a foreign language or a little overwhelming they can keep your business finances in order and make tax time a lot easier when it comes time to file.  Making the everyday accounting run smoothly can be done with Donohoo Accounting Services. Call us today for your free evaluation and let us take the stress out of your day-to-day money functions.

Are Your Business Receipts Audit Ready?

Do you often ignore or say too quickly “No” when asked whether you want a receipt?  Not small-business owners. Knowledgeable business owners just know how to keep receipts. If they don’t, their tax return could be at risk. The question is: Are your business receipts audit ready?

  1. TAKE NOTICE

The first mindset to get into (especially if you’re trying to prepare your receipts for taxes) is creating a tiny note of the business purpose on the receipt. Whether or not you inscribe directly or put aside time at the top of the day, week, or once a large amount of buying has been completed (say at the end of a business trip for example), you’ll need the purchases to be recent enough in your mind that you will remember to label them properly.

Be sure that you create the note because this one thing which will permit you to classify the expense later. Merely writing “lunch” might not be enough to jog your memory if you’re audited a year or two later.

  1. CLASSIFY

Now that you’ve taken note of all these numbers, the next step is following and organizing it, so you can put the receipts into specific classifications. This will make tax time a breeze and permit you to refer back to any receipts without having to look through tons of files.

Here are some samples of common classifications for tax-deductible purchases:

  • Advertising: includes things such as business cards, mailing lists/mailing list software, brochures, outside marketing company, website design, development, and maintenance.

 

Advertising: includes things such as business cards, mailing lists/mailing list software, brochures, outside marketing company, website design, development, and maintenance
Advertising: includes things such as business cards, mailing lists/mailing list software, brochures, outside marketing company, website design, development, and maintenance.

 

  • Travel: there are certain criteria to meet for travel expenses to be deductible, but items that may be included are lodging, meals, airfare, baggage & shipping, rentals, taxis, dry cleaning and mileage, and parking expenses.

 

 there are certain criteria to meet for travel expenses to be deductible, but items that may be included are lodging, meals, airfare, baggage & shipping, rentals, taxis, dry cleaning and mileage, and parking expenses
there are certain criteria to meet for travel expenses to be deductible, but items that may be included are lodging, meals, airfare, baggage & shipping, rentals, taxis, dry cleaning and mileage, and parking expenses.

 

  • Entertainment and Meals: These items may be examined thoroughly by the IRS so be sure these items get listed correctly such as from a business trip.

 

  • Legal and Professional Fees: attorney’s fees, accountant’s fees, other professional consultants’ fees directly related to your business.

 

  • Indemnification: may include business liability insurance premiums, property insurance premiums, disability premiums, workers’ compensation premiums for employees.

 

  • Professional Dues and Licenses: may include franchise fees, professional license fees, business licenses.

 

  • In-Kind: Gifts given to business contacts are deductible but are limited to $25 per person, per year.

 

In-Kind: Gifts given to business contacts are deductible but are limited to $25 per person, per year.
In-Kind: Gifts given to business contacts are deductible but are limited to $25 per person, per year.

 

  1. BE THOROUGH

A crucial step is organizing your receipts and being thorough with your method. Attempt to keep expenses separated by paying with a “business only” designated credit card or bank account when possible and avoid paying in hard cash.

Over time you may find better and newer apps to help manage your receipts but remember to keep using the same classifying process.  By keeping your method, you will be consistent in your receipts collecting and keeping all the overall information easily acceptable to you and your accountant

Duane Donohoo being self-employed himself understands the challenges of owning a small business. He understands the burden the IRS can be to a small business or individual. It was this experience that relates to his self-employment clients and individual clients. Call today (513-528-3982) for a free consultation to find out how Donohoo Accounting Services, Inc. can serve you.

What To Bring To Your Accountant When You File Taxes

Although it’s technically possible to file your own tax return by using software, this can leave you exposed to a wide range of issues. If you want to ensure that everything with your tax return is handled by an experienced professional, working with a reputable accountant is an investment that should always pay off by unlocking extra savings and helping you avoid mistakes.

If you’re planning on enlisting an accountant’s help this year and are wondering what to expect during your appointment, here are some helpful tips on what to bring to your accountant when you file taxes:

Social Security Cards

The accountant you work with will want to verify your identity prior to submitting your filing. And if you are claiming any dependents, it’s a good idea to bring their card along as well. Although social security numbers seem like an easy enough thing to manage, SSN mistakes result in 100,000s of tax returns being sent back by the IRS every year. Since that’s guaranteed to increase how long it takes to get your refund, bring along your cards so your accountant will be able to double check the accuracy of these numbers.

Last Year’s Tax Return

Even if your financial situation has changed quite a bit over the last year, it’s still helpful for an accountant to have your previous year’s return as a reference point. This will allow the professional you work with to identify which deductions and credits you previously claimed, then quickly see if you’re eligible for them again.

W-2 and Any Other Income Forms

If you work as a traditional employee at a company, your employer should have already provided you with a W-2 form this year. This document has a lot of important information your accountant will need, so be sure to bring it along. For freelancers, the most common form to receive is a 1099-Misc. And if you have any investments or other activities that produced income, you’ll want to bring all of those forms along for the accountant to review.

Expense Documentation

Did you make some charitable donations over the course of last year? Maybe you do some selling online and drove around a lot to source inventory. Regardless of the specific donation or expense, an accountant is going to want to see documentation before claiming it for you. While it may take some time for you to get organized prior to your appointment, it will be well worth the effort.

If you’re ready to file your tax return and want to work with a great Cincinnati accountant, Donohoo Accounting Services is here to help. Call us today at (513) 528-3982 to schedule an appointment.