6 Tips For Homeowners To Maximize Their Tax Deductions

Owning a home is one of the biggest investments most people make in their lifetime. Being aware of tax deductions and other credits available will give this big purchase every opportunity to pay you back a little come tax time. Here are six tips for homeowners to maximize your tax deduction:

Tip #1: Be Organized

Keep detailed records of your home-related expenses, financial documents and receipts. Most federal income tax deductions and credits require a paper trail, so the more organized your records are, the easier the process will be and the more likely it is that nothing will be missed or forgotten.

Tip #2: Deduct Your Mortgage Interest

If your mortgage is less than $750,000, you can deduct the interest you pay on the loan for no more than two residences. This could be your primary residence, summer home, or even a boat if it has plumbing or a bathroom. You can also include interest you may have paid when you closed on your home.

If you own more than two properties, be sure to use the deductions from the property that will give you the largest tax deduction — it may not necessarily be the property with the biggest mortgage payment.

Tip #3: Deduct Your Home Office Space

If you work from home in a dedicated space, you can deduct that space on your taxes. The current tax law allows you to deduct $5 for each square foot of office space, up to 300 square feet. This law has been taken advantage of by some, which is why it has earned a reputation of being an audit trigger. Make sure the space you deduct is exclusively used for your business or side hustle.

Tip #4: Deduct Your Property Taxes

With the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, deducting your property taxes is still possible but not as flexible as it once was. You can now deduct up to $10,000, and that includes a combination of state and local tax deductions and state and local property tax deductions.

Tip #5: Consider Energy Efficient Upgrades

Tax incentives have changed for these types of upgrades, but some are worth looking into. Purchases for electric and water heating equipment, solar panels, rain barrels and drought tolerant landscaping may apply. Make sure to do your due diligence and triple check the specific requirements and deadlines for these green projects.

Tip #6: Age-In-Place Deductions

If you plan to live in your residence as you get older, you may be able to deduct expenditures for home improvement projects that will assist you as you age. Upgrades such as wheelchair ramps, lowering cabinets and electrical fixtures, and installing bathtub grab bars may qualify.

Donohoo Accounting Services is here to help you understand the IRS rules and determine the types of tax deductions you may be eligible for. With more than 20 years of experience in the business, we can help you reduce your tax burden by finding every deduction possible. If you would like to set up a free consultation, contact us at 513-528-3982. For more tips and our latest updates, check us out on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn!

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Year-End Tax Moves To Make Now

Most people don’t think about taxes when it’s not tax season, but you absolutely should. 2020 has been unusual in every way, and the upcoming tax season will likely follow suit because there are tax moves you can make before the end of this year that will benefit you once you file. Here are a few that we suggest:

Track receipts

If you are self-employed and working from home, you can deduct your office space (it has to be used just for work) and any expenses you incur. If your income was lower than usual but your medical expenses were higher, you might qualify for deduction. Best practice for 2020? Save your receipts.

Don’t forget about other taxable income

Many people were furloughed or lost their jobs this year because of the stay-at-home order. If you picked up a side hustle to make ends meet, your earnings are considered taxable income, even if you don’t have official paperwork that details the money. Unemployment benefits are taxable, too. If you received any of those, you’ll have to fill out a 1099-G form and enter those amounts on your tax return. If withholdings weren’t taken out of those payments, you’ll have to make up for it when calculating your 2020 estimated tax payments.

Max out for retirement

If your income went up this year, it’s the perfect opportunity to reduce your tax liability by increasing your contribution to your retirement account.

Conversely, if your income went down and you had to borrow from your retirement account, you won’t pay penalties but you will have to account for that on your taxes for the next three years.

Make the most of your savings

If the stay-at-home order resulted in prepaid vacation refunds, fewer travel expenses or less spending in general, you may find yourself with a slightly larger wallet. If that’s the case, make the most of that money by investing it now in a long-term savings account, such as a 529 or Roth IRA.

Check your withholdings

If your income has changed, check your paycheck to make sure you are withholding enough for federal taxes to avoid penalties and interest to the IRS. The IRS has a tool to help you do this, but you will have to manually calculate it for your state withholdings.

Revisit your stimulus eligibility

If your income decreased in 2020, you might qualify for the stimulus payment made available from the CARES act, even if you didn’t qualify in 2019 or 2018. There will likely be extra documentation to fill out with the IRS Form 1040. The credit will automatically be applied if you are eligible.

We understand that tax filing can be overwhelming in the most normal of situations, so it will be especially challenging when filing for this year. We also know you have a life to lead and business to run, so let us handle your accounting issues and headaches. If you have any questions about what you should be doing now for the upcoming tax season, please reach out to Donohoo Accounting Services today at 513-528-3982 for a free consultation.

For more tips and our latest updates, check us out on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn!

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Personal Tax Prep Checklist

Getting ready to file your 2019 personal income taxes can be a daunting task of collecting information. But don’t worry, the pros at Donohoo Accounting Services are here to help! The information required to file your income taxes neatly falls into four categories: Your personal information, dependents’ information, income sources and deductions.

Your Personal Information

While most people may have this information ready-at-hand for other purposes, others may have to locate it. Either way, you will need it to file your federal, state and local income taxes. Be sure to have your Social Security number or tax ID number, as well as the full name and Social Security number or tax ID number for your spouse if you are married. If you have this information in written or printed form, be sure to shred the document after your tax preparation for security purposes. Professional accountants take very good care to do this.

Dependent Information

You will need the full names of your children or dependents along with their Social Security numbers or tax ID numbers. Having either their Social Security cards or their names and numbers in written or printed form may make filing easier for your tax preparer. However, as mentioned above, be sure to shred the document after your tax preparation for security purposes.

Income Sources
This is where collecting income tax information starts to get tricky, but you can do this!

W-2 Forms

If you and your spouse work a regular full-time or part-time job, your employer will issue a W-2 Form that shows your earnings and tax deductions for the year. Some employers mail W-2 Forms to their employees while others provide access to an electronic document online that you can download and print. Either way, secure a paper copy of your W-2 Forms for yourself and for your spouse.

1099 Forms

Companies issue this form to contracted workers who earn more than $600 within one tax year. Additionally, you may receive a 1099 Form if you received income from non-work sources such as investments, rental income, prior years’ state and local income tax refunds, lottery or gambling winnings, unemployment compensation or retirement benefits. In addition to the 1099 Form, you may be required to provide additional documentation for income earned outside of your primary job. Your tax professional can provide details.

Deductions

Although this area of tax filing seems complicated to most people, taking deductions can reduce your tax liability and may increase the likelihood of your getting an income tax refund. More than a dozen kinds of income tax deductions can be taken, but the most popular deductions are for qualified charitable contributions, home mortgage interest, educational expenses and medical expenses. While you may receive year-end statements from the institutions that received your contributions or payments, consult with your tax professional for details about the kinds of records you need to provide when claiming deductions.

To help you find the most deductions and keep your personal information secure, contact Donohoo Accounting Services at 513-528-3982 for a free consultation. We have served and earned the trust of individuals and small businesses throughout the Greater Cincinnati area for more than 20 years.

Check us out on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn for our latest updates!

contact Donohoo Accounting

Prepare Now for Filing Your Personal Taxes

Getting ready to file your personal income taxes can be a daunting task of collecting information. But don’t worry, the pros at Donohoo Accounting Services are here to help! The information required to file your income taxes neatly falls into four categories: Your personal information, dependents’ information, income sources and deductions.

Your Personal Information

While most people may have this information ready at-hand for other purposes, others may have to locate it. Either way, you will need it to file your federal, state and local income taxes. Be sure to have your Social Security number or tax ID number, as well as the full name and Social Security number or tax ID number for your spouse if you are married. If you have this information in written or printed form, be sure to shred the document after your tax preparation for security purposes. Professional accountants take very good care to do this.

Dependent Information

You will need the full names of your children or dependents along with their Social Security numbers or tax ID numbers. Having either their Social Security cards or their names and numbers in written or printed form may make filing easier for your tax preparer. However, as mentioned above, be sure to shred the document after your tax preparation for identity security purposes.

Income Sources

This is where collecting income tax information starts to get tricky, but you can do this!

W-2 Forms –If you and your spouse work a regular full-time or part-time job, your employer will issue a W-2 Form that shows your earnings and tax deductions for the year. Some employers mail W-2 Forms to their employees while others provide access to an electronic document online that you can download and print. Either way, secure a paper copy of your W-2 Forms for yourself and for your spouse.

1099 Forms –Companies issue this form to contracted workers who earn more than $600 within one tax year. Additionally, you may receive a 1099 Form if you received income from non-work sources such as investments, rental income, prior years’ state and local income tax refunds, lottery or gambling winnings, unemployment compensation or retirement benefits. In addition to the 1099 Form, you may be required to provide additional documentation for income earned outside of your primary job. Your tax professional can provide details.

Deductions

Although this area of tax filing seems complicated to most people, taking deductions can reduce your tax liability and may increase the likelihood of your getting an income tax refund. More than a dozen kinds of income tax deductions can be taken, but the most popular deductions are for qualified charitable contributions, home mortgage interest, educational expenses and medical expenses. While you may receive year-end statements from the institutions that received your contributions or payments, consult with your tax professional for details about the kinds of records you need provide when claiming deductions.

To help you find the most deductions and keep your personal information secure, contact Donohoo Accounting Services at 513-528-3982 for a free consultation. We have servedand earned the trust of individuals and small businesses throughout the Greater Cincinnati area for more than 20 years.

Check us out on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn for our latest updates!