Four Tips To Save For College

Depending on grades a great score on the ACT or SAT, your future college student could have a big scholarship in his or her future. If you – and your student – haven’t been saving for college, how can you save as much as possible before the first tuition bill arrives? Whether you have a short amount of time or a decade, these four tips will give you a start on how to save for college.

Start with a goal

A college savings goal consists not only of a dollar amount but also includes a date or deadline. The most common way to compute a college savings goal is to divide the total dollar amount needed by the number of years you have to save. Another popular goal-setting method is to multiply the student’s age by $2,000. This will give you roughly the amount you should have in savings to cover 50 percent of the student’s college expenses.

Use the 10 percent rule

Could you live on 90 percent of your household income for a period of time? Probably so. Most people could, simply by looking for ways to reduce their spending. While you budget to live on 90 percent of your take-home pay, the other 10 percent goes into an educational savings account (ESA), 529 college savings account or even an interest-bearing savings account (or some combination of these). Depending on your total household income, 10 percent a year could add up to quite a bit between now and the start of college.

Save income from part-time or summer jobs

Even better than the 10 percent rule is the 100 percent rule – but only make it apply to income earned from part-time or summer jobs that your student works. A student earning $8 an hour working year-round in a part-time job can earn up to $8,000 during a single year. That’s a sizeable contribution toward college expenses! Parents can double that amount by offering to match dollar-for-dollar the amount their student saves each year.

Sell unused and unwanted items

Collectibles, antiques and even used appliances have the potential to bring in a handsome sum when sold online or in yard sales. Put your family and relatives to work scouring their attics, basements, and garages for anything of value that can be sold to add to your college savings account. The more unused or unwanted items you can sell – even for small dollar amounts – will eventually add up to help meet college expenses.

Need help developing your college savings plan? Donohoo Accounting can get you started. Contact us today to schedule your free consultation or call 513-528-3982.

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5 Ways to Make Yourself Save Money

We’re all good at something, but not everything. And saving money is one of those things that lots of people say they’re not good at doing, But, what if saving money didn’t require lots of “doing?” What if it required only a little effort and almost no time? What if saving money could be built into your current lifestyle? If this sounds good to you, there are at least five ways to save money that require low commitment on your part, but which have the potential to yield bigger rewards than your current efforts to save money.

Sell old items and bank the money

Most people look at their income and reason that they simply don’t have enough money to pay the bills, live and save. Let’s assume that’s true, and so we’ll look somewhere else for money to save besides your paycheck. Look to the items you have stored around your house that are going unused and consider their value if you sold them. Attics, basements, garages and storage lockers are the primary places for valuable — and unused — items to end up. Selling these items online or in a yard sale affords the potential to bring in hundreds of dollars that don’t have to come out of your paycheck to go into your savings account.

Collect and store change

Another way to save money without going directly to your income source is to collect and store change when you make cash purchases. Get a large container, such as a popcorn tin. Every time you feel coins jingling in your pocket or in your purse, throw them in the tin and close the lid. Every now and then, throw a dollar bill in there or a $5 bill. When the tin is full and you count your savings, you may be surprised by how much you’ve saved!

Round up purchases and save the difference

Much like saving coins, a great way to save without feeling too much of a pinch is by using a personal finance app that rounds up your online purchases to the nearest dollar, and then saves the overage to your savings account.

Make a “dream” board

Saving money should always include a goal, so why not make the goal – or dream – come true? Create a dream board that features photos of the item or occasion for which you’re saving. Hang your dream board in an obvious place where you’ll see it every day to remind yourself why you’re saving. Every time you look at the board, put a few dollars aside. Or,when you’re budgeting, look at the dream board to motivate yourself to sock that money away!

Make saving a priority

Whichever one or more methods you choose, you must make saving money a priority if you truly have a desire and a reason to save. Look for additional ways to save,such as using coupons, delaying unnecessary purchases, paying cash instead of using credit, and all the other go-to ways of saving that your parents or grandparents used. In the long run, they’ll free up additional dollars for you to put in the popcorn tin or the savings account and they’ll help you acquire the things you have on your dream board.

Need help managing your finances? Donohoo Accounting Services is a professional accounting services provider, dedicated to helping our clients overcome their financial challenges. To learn more about how Donohoo Accounting Services can help, call us today at 513-528-3982 for a free consultation.

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Get Your Money in Order for the New Year

This year is quickly coming to a close. Get ahead of the game and get your money in order for the new year. Don’t know where to begin? No worries! Here are some helpful tips.

Get Organized

Organize Concept Metal Letterpress Word in Drawer

You can file taxes after the new year, so now’s a good time to get all your ducks in a row. In January and early February, you’ll be receiving important documents in the mail including your W2, mortgage interest statement (1098), or student loan interest statement (1098-E.)Most companies, by law, have until January 31 to mail statements, so keep an eye out.

Designate a single location where you’ll keep these documents so they are easily accessible when you’re ready to file taxes. You can use a folder, drawer, box or other container. Put a large “taxes” label on it and use the container for tax-related documents only, not other mail or bills. But you may want to keepit near where you sort mail, so you can immediately put the documents in their home.

Then start gathering other items you’ll need for filing taxes, including charitable contributionand expense receipts. Qualified expenses depend on your situation, but could include expenses related to childcare, medical, job (mileage, supplies, relocation) and education. Donohoo Accounting Services can help you navigate the complicated tax structure. In addition to income tax preparation, we handle payroll tax prep, tax levies and liens, back taxes, end tax penalties, estate tax return preparationand more.

Make Year-End Charitable Contributions

Many charities do a final fundraising push at the end of the year, so you’ll probably receive solicitations asking for support. If you want to help non-profit organizations while also possibly reducing your taxable income, make your donations by December 31. Contributions are deductible in the year made. Thus, donations charged to a credit card before the end of the yearwill count in that year – even if the credit card bill isn’t paid until later. You’ll want to make sure the charity is eligible. Many times, the charity will note its “501c3” status, which is IRS speak for tax-exempt. You can also use the IRS Tax Exempt Organization Search.

Take an Assessment of Where You Stand Financially

Magnifying glass showing assessment word on grey background

Now’s a good time to take a hard look at your income, debt, expenses, retirement funds, college and emergency savings. Are you on track to meet financial goals? If yes – great! If no – why are you falling short? To properly move forward into the next year, you need a realistic picture of where you are now. Put pen to paper and write down all the numbers. It helps to see everything in black and white.

Make a Financial New Year’s Resolution (Or Better Yet – Create APlan You’ll Stick With All Year)

Once you know where you stand currently, you can create a plan for the upcoming year. Perhaps you want an emergency savings fund. You never know when the furnace is going to go out, someone in your family has a medical issue or there’s a company layoff. Experts say you should have enough emergency savings to cover three to sixth months of expenses. Maybe you have all your financial bases covered but want to take an exotic vacation? Set the goal, create a plan and start saving for that overseas beach trip. Although it’s a busy holiday season, set aside time to get your money in order for the new year. Once you’re ready to file taxes, turn to Donohoo Accounting Services, locally owned and operated by Cincinnati native, Duane Donohoo.

What Are The Basics Of Accounting Methods

What are accounting methods? Accounting methods help businesses keep their cash records and assist in preparing money reports by utilizing two fundamental methods of record-keeping for cash.  These two methods are cash-basis and accrual basis accounting.  These methods both have their own distinctive advantages of keeping corporate record keeping which help keep track of money coming an and out of the business. Donohoo Accounting knows what are the two types of accounting methods and how to utilize the for your business.

 

Accounting methods help businesses keep their cash records and assist in preparing money reports by utilizing two fundamental methods of record-keeping for cash.
Accounting methods help businesses keep their cash records and assist in preparing money reports by utilizing two fundamental methods of record-keeping for cash.

 

CASH-BASIS ACCOUNTING

What is cash-basis accounting? Corporations recording expenses in financial accounts when the cash is laid out, and they book revenue when they actually hold the cash in their hot little hands or, more likely, in a bank account. For example, if a plumber completed a project on December 30, 2018, but doesn’t get paid for it until the owner inspects it on January 10, 2019, the plumber reports those cash earnings on her 2018 tax report. In cash-basis accounting, cash earnings include checks, credit-card receipts, or any other form of revenue from customers.

 

Corporations recording expenses in financial accounts when the cash is laid out, and they book revenue when they actually hold the cash in their hot little hands or, more likely, in a bank account.
Corporations recording expenses in financial accounts when the cash is laid out, and they book revenue when they actually hold the cash in their hot little hands or, more likely, in a bank account.

 

ACCRUAL ACCOUNTING

Does your company use accrual accounting? This method is when you record revenue when the actual business is completed ex. (is when the completed amount of work that was stated in a contract agreement between the company and its client), not when it obtains the cash. The company records income when it produces it, even if the customer hasn’t paid yet. For example, a plumbing contractor who uses accrual accounting records the revenue earned when the job is completed, even if the client hasn’t paid the final invoice yet. Expenditures are handled in the same way.

 

The company records income when it produces it, even if the customer hasn’t paid yet.
The company records income when it produces it, even if the customer hasn’t paid yet.

 

BASIC ACCOUNTING TERMS

  • Equity: The net worth of your company. Also called owner’s equity or capital. Equity comes from investment in the business by the owners, plus accumulated net profits of the business that have not been paid out to the owners. It essentially represents amounts owed to the owners. Equity accounts are balance sheet accounts.

 

  • Assets: Things of value held by your business. Assets are balance sheet accounts. Examples of assets are cash, accounts receivable and furniture and fixtures.

 

  • Liabilities: What your business owes creditors. Liabilities are balance sheet accounts. Examples are accounts payable, payroll taxes payable and loans payable.

 

  • Debits: At least one component of every accounting transaction is a debit amount. Debits increase assets and decrease liabilities and equity.

 

 

While all these terms may seem a foreign language or a little overwhelming they can keep your business finances in order and make tax time a lot easier when it comes time to file.  Making the everyday accounting run smoothly can be done with Donohoo Accounting Services. Call us today for your free evaluation and let us take the stress out of your day-to-day money functions.